1st Grade Reading

 

 

First Grade Units (Based upon Oregon K-12 Literacy Framework):

Phonemic Awareness – There are 44 phonemes (or uniquely different sounds) that are used in the English language. Here is a guide to the phonemes (which I referred to extensively, when setting up the structure below). Why is there so many letter combinations used for the same sounds? English has been influenced by many other languages, over time, as it has evolved.

  • Consonants – These are letter combinations that make a single consonant sound. Consonants are sounds made by letters that require your mouth to be fully or partially blocked, and CANNOT be made louder or quieter (For a review & examples of teachers in classrooms).
    • Sound = /b/; letters = bb; example = bubble
      • bb
    • Sound = /d/; letters = dd, ed; example = add, milled
    • Sound = /f/; letters = ff, ph, gf, lf, ft; example = cliff, phone, enough, half, often
      • ff
      • ph
      • gf
      • lf
      • ft
    • Sound = /g/; letters = gg, gh, gu, gue; example = egg, ghost, guest, prologue
      • gg
      • gh
      • gu
      • gue
    • Sound = /h/; letters = wh; example = who
      • wh
    • Sound = /j/; letters = ge, dge, di, gg; example = wage, edge, soldier, exaggerate
      • ge
      • dge
      • di
      • gg
    • Sound = /k/; letters = cc, ch, lk, qu, q(u), ck, x; example = accent, Chris, walk, banquet, queen, back, box (Personally, I am not certain about the difference between qu & q(u), and I hear a sound different than k when I use them, as is true with x. As I continue to research this matter, I will look for an answer for this question)
    • Sound = /l/; letters = ll; example = ball
    • Sound = /m/; letters = mm, mb, mn, lm; example = summer, comb, column, palm
      • mm
      • mb
      • mn
      • lm (when I say palm, the l is pronounced; I need to look into this further)
    • Sound = /n/; letters = nn, kn, gn, pn; example = funny, know, gnu, pneumonia
      • nn
      • kn
      • gn
      • pn
    • Sound = /p/; letters = pp; example = drippy
      • pp
    • Q is rarely used without u (see it listed under /k/)
    • Sound = /r/; letters = rr, wr, rh; example = carrot, write, rhyme
    • Sound = /s/; letters = ss, sc, sp, st, ce, se; example = glass, science, psyco, listen, pace, course
      • ss
      • sc
      • sp
      • st
      • ce
      • se
    • Sound = /v/; letters = f, ph, ve; example = of, Stephen, five
      • f
      • ph
      • ve
    • Sound = /w/; letters = wh, u, o; example = what, quick, choir
      • wh
      • u
      • o
    • Sound = /z/; letters = ss, zz, se, ze; example = buzz, scissors, accuse, craze
      • ss
      • zz
      • se
      • ze
  • Vowels – Vowels are sounds made by letters that require your mouth to be open, unblocked, and can be made louder or quieter (For a review & examples of teachers in classrooms). I put these after, consonants because vowels and digraphs are typically more difficult for dyslexic students to learn, than consonants, as they frequently get interchanged.
    • Sound = /a/; letters = a, ai, au; example =
    • Sound = /ā/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /e/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /ē/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /i/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /ī/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /o/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /ō/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /oo/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /u/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /ū/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /y//ü/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /oi/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /ow/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /ə/ (schwa); letters = ; example =
  • R Controlled Vowels
    • Sound = /ã/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /ä/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /û/; letters = er, ir, ur, ear, or, our, yr; example =
    • Sound = /ô/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /ēə/; letters = ; example =
    • Sound = /üə/; letters = ; example =
  • Digraphs
    • Sound = /zh/; letters = s, si, z; example = treasure, division, azure
      • s
      • si
      • z
    • Sound = /ch/; letters = ch, tch, te, ti, tu; example = chip, hutch, righteous, action, future
    • Sound = /sh/; letters = sh, ce, s, ci, si, ch, sci, ti; example = shoe, ocean, sure, special, pension, machine, conscience, station
      • sh
      • ce
      • s
      • ci
      • si
      • ch
      • sci
      • ti
    • Sound = /th/; letters = th (voiced), th (unvoiced); example = thongs, leather
      • th (voiced)
      • th (unvoiced)
    • Sound = /ng/; letters = ng, n, ngue; example =sing, pink, tongue
      • ng
      • n
      • ngue
  • Games for reviewing skills

Phonics

Accuracy and Fluency With Connected Text (begins half way through the year)

  • Begins after students develop proficiency in phonics.

Vocabulary

  • Content of vocabulary instruction is from books and other curriculum materials teachers read to students.

Comprehension

  • [Add more later]